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Knowing when to break a fast is your key to safe fasting. (Assuming you've read Who Can Fast and are sure you're a proper candidate for fasting.) When fasting, our bodies change from normal functioning to that of healing and recuperation. An internal cleansing of toxins and inferior materials can begin because so much energy is now freed up that used to go to digestion.

Without eating though, how are we fueling our body? Ketosis is a complex metabolic process used by the body when there is insufficient glucose--the body's main fuel. This is said to be "muscle sparing" as without it, the body would breakdown muscle to provide the components necessary to produce the required glucose. Instead of breaking down muscle tissue, your body will break down fatty deposits, producing ketones for fuel.

After about 3 days of water fasting, you will be in the state of ketosis. This state is usually high energy with a clear mental capability. But a unique facet of it is a total lack of hunger.

Some fasters, not all, can go for weeks without food and yet never feel hungry. As you might expect, those who are overweight can go longer, whereas thin individuals must stop sooner. But don't let a lot of excess weight fool you into thinking you can go any certain length of time.

To deny food when true hunger has signaled is to begin the act of starvation. The body is telling you it now needs outside nutrition as it has depleted its reserves, or its ability to rely on those reserves. If it has been operating in the state of ketosis, it is telling you it no longer can safely.

True hunger is a sensation in the mouth and throat, similar to thirst, and not a gnawing pain in the stomach. The way it will get your attention is that comes after many days of experiencing no hunger. Seemingly out of the blue, you'll have an intense desire for food.

When food is taken at this point, it tastes extraordinarily wonderful, a real sensual treat. And the act of eating itself is fulfilling, creating feelings of contentment and pleasure. This is the experience eating is supposed to be.

Having once experienced this "true hunger", you will no longer confuse it with the emotional desire or physical discomfort we usually associate with hunger. Such physical "hunger pains" felt either in the stomach, or as "hunger headaches", are said to actually be withdrawal and detox symptoms from rich foods, chemicals, and stimulants.

The reason they go away when you eat something is because you have stopped the cleansing detox as your body must once again put its energy into digestion and assimilation.

After fasting, when you've returned to a regular (but healthier) diet, you'll be able to tell when you are truly hungry, experiencing "real hunger", versus when you just think you're hungry because you feel like eating.

Rapid heart rate, drop in heart rate, or irregular heart beat are all signs to end the fast. During a water fast, general weakness developing over time is considered normal as the body seeks to conserve energy, but sudden and extreme weakness should be taken seriously by ending the fast.

If any of these conditions present themselves, break the fast with some fresh juice or a small piece of fresh fruit. Watermelon is frequently used to break a fast because of the high water content, but any juicy fruit will do. If using juice, drink 6-8 ounces of diluted juice, sipping slowly. Do this every 2 hours.

Side effects such as those above are more common during fasts of longer duration. Shorter fasts of 2-3 days won't usually be accompanied by such symptoms.

Listen to your intuition as well. If you're feeling like something may be wrong or something feels "off" to you, maybe you should stop. You can always fast another day.

See Guidelines for Breaking a Fast for greater understanding of the breaking process.

If we want to have a safe fasting experience, we need to make the space to listen to our bodies. And educate ourselves as much as possible before beginning. Consider getting professional supervision for longer fasts or for treating chronic conditions.

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Aug 30th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

Safety Information Consult with a doctor before using this product if you are being treated for any medical condition and/or you have a condition that requires you to take prescription drugs of any kind.

Indications For use as a DIETARY SUPPLEMENT when managing your diet in an effort to control appetite, reduce body fat and maintain weight loss, using a proprietary blend of clinically proven, all-natural ingredients, antioxidants and multi-vitamins. This product contains caffeine. Individuals who are caffeine sensitive may experience symptoms including, but not limited to, headache, restlessness, palpitations or insomnia. Do not mix with other sources of caffeine. For best results, use in conjunction with a proper diet and regular exercise. **Consult a physician before starting any diet or exercise program.

Ingredients Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine HCl) Vit B12 (Cyanocobalamin) Citrus aurantium 30% Guarana 22% Caffeine Anhydrous Bioperine Bacopa Monniera Vinpocetine Choline Bitartrate Phenylthylamine Tyrosine Green Coffee Bean Ext Svetol Green Coffee Raspberry Ketones Evodiamine 98% Green Tea Ext Norcoclaurine HCL (Higenamine) Rhodiola rosea Root Ext Quercetin Ashwaganda Rt

Directions DOSAGE and DIRECTIONS For Liporidex MAX: Take TWO CAPSULES in the morning, along with a tall glass of water, preferably on an empty stomach and ONE CAPSULE 5-6 hours later in the mid-afternoon, for a TOTAL of 3 Capsules a day. Do NOT Exceed 4 Capsules in a 24 hour period. Drink plenty of water throughout the day to avoid dehydration. When first using the product, take only ONE capsule to first establish you're not caffeine/stimulant sensitive.

Legal Disclaimer FDA Statement: Results may vary. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product is not intended to treat, diagnose, mitigate, prevent, or cure any condition or disease. These statements are based upon studies on the effects of specific key individual ingredients contained in the supplement and not any any study on the combination of ingredients. Consult with your doctor or physician before beginning any supplement or weight loss program. lipoRIDEX, lipoRIDEX MAXTM, lipoRIDEX PLUSTM lipoRIDEX NRGTM, and lipoRIDEX PMTM are trademarks of Nuretix Research Labs, LLC.

Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. Please see our full disclaimer below.

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Aug 27th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

The Diet The Perfect Health Diet

Heres our Perfect Health Diet food plate:

NOTE: This is our new food plate, updated 2015. Foreign translations of the original food plate may be found here.

We recommend:

By weight, the diet works out to about 3/4 plant foods, 1/4 animal foods. By calories, it works out to about 600 carb calories, primarily from starches; around 300 protein calories; and fats supply a majority (50-60%) of daily calories.

In the shadow of the apple are foods forbidden because of their high toxin content. Notably:

We highly recommend certain foods for their micronutrients. These include liver, kidney, egg yolks, seaweeds, shellfish, fermented vegetables, and bone broths.

We also recommend augmenting the diet with certain supplements. See our Supplement Recommendations page. These nutrients are deficient in modern diets due to removal of minerals from drinking water by treatment, depletion of minerals from soil by agriculture, or modern lifestyles that deprive us of vitamin D by indoor living.

We recommend tweaking the diet for certain diseases. Neurological disorders often benefit from a diet that is ketogenic; other conditions may benefit from lower carb diets. These variations are discussed in the book:

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Aug 25th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

In nutrition, diet is the sum of food consumed by a person or other organism.[1]

Dietary habits are the habitual decisions an individual or culture makes when choosing what foods to eat. The word diet often implies the use of specific intake of nutrition for health or weight-management reasons (with the two often being related). Although humans are omnivores, each culture and each person holds some food preferences or some food taboos. This may be due to personal tastes or ethical reasons. Individual dietary choices may be more or less healthy.

Proper nutrition requires ingestion and absorption of vitamins, minerals, and food energy in the form of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Dietary habits and choices play a significant role in the quality of life, health and longevity. It can define cultures and play a role in religion.

Some cultures and religions have restrictions concerning what foods are acceptable in their diet. For example, only Kosher foods are permitted by Judaism, and Halal foods by Islam. Although Buddhists are generally vegetarians, the practice varies and meat-eating may be permitted depending on the sects.[2] In Hinduism, vegetarianism is the ideal, Jain are strictly vegetarian and consumption of roots is not permitted.

Many people choose to forgo food from animal sources to varying degrees (e.g. flexitarianism, vegetarianism, veganism, fruitarianism) for health reasons, issues surrounding morality, or to reduce their personal impact on the environment, although some of the public assumptions about which diets have lower impacts are known to be incorrect.[3]Raw foodism is another contemporary trend. These diets may require tuning or supplementation such as vitamins to meet ordinary nutritional needs.

A particular diet may be chosen to seek weight loss or weight gain. Changing a subject's dietary intake, or "going on a diet", can change the energy balance and increase or decrease the amount of fat stored by the body. Some foods are specifically recommended, or even altered, for conformity to the requirements of a particular diet. These diets are often recommended in conjunction with exercise. Specific weight loss programs can be harmful to health, while others may be beneficial (and can thus be coined as healthy diets). The terms "healthy diet" and "diet for weight management" are often related, as the two promote healthy weight management. Having a healthy diet is a way to prevent health problems, and will provide your body with the right balance of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients.[4]

An eating disorder is a mental disorder that interferes with normal food consumption. It is defined by abnormal eating habits that may involve either insufficient or excessive diet.

A healthy diet may improve or maintain optimal health. In developed countries, affluence enables unconstrained caloric intake and possibly inappropriate food choices.[5]

It is recommended by many authorities that people maintain a normal weight by (limiting consumption of energy-dense foods and sugary drinks), eat plant-based food, limit red and processed meat, and limit alcohol.[6]

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Diet (nutrition) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Aug 7th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

A healthy diet is one that helps maintain or improve overall health.

A healthy diet provides the body with essential nutrition: fluid, adequate essential amino acids from protein,[1] essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and adequate calories. The requirements for a healthy diet can be met from a variety of plant-based and animal-based foods. A healthy diet supports energy needs and provides for human nutrition without exposure to toxicity or excessive weight gain from consuming excessive amounts. Where lack of calories is not an issue, a properly balanced diet (in addition to exercise) is also thought to be important for lowering health risks, such as obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cancer.[2]

Various nutrition guides are published by medical and governmental institutions to educate the public on what they should be eating to promote health. Nutrition facts labels are also mandatory in some countries to allow consumers to choose between foods based on the components relevant to health.

The idea of dietary therapy (using dietary choices to maintain health and improve poor health) is quite old and thus has both modern scientific forms (medical nutrition therapy) and prescientific forms (such as dietary therapy in traditional Chinese medicine).

The World Health Organization (WHO) makes the following 5 recommendations with respect to both populations and individuals:[3]

Other recommendations include:

The American Heart Association, World Cancer Research Fund, and American Institute for Cancer Research recommends a diet that consists mostly of unprocessed plant foods, with emphasis a wide range of whole grains, legumes, and non-starchy vegetables and fruits. This healthy diet is replete with a wide range of various non-starchy vegetables and fruits, that provide different colors including red, green, yellow, white, purple, and orange. They note that tomato cooked with oil, allium vegetables like garlic, and cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower, provide some protection against cancer. This healthy diet is low in energy density, which may protect against weight gain and associated diseases. Finally, limiting consumption of sugary drinks, limiting energy rich foods, including fast foods and red meat, and avoiding processed meats improves health and longevity. Overall, researchers and medical policy conclude that this healthy diet can reduce the risk of chronic disease and cancer.[5][6]

The Nutrition Source of Harvard School of Public Health makes the following 10 recommendations for a healthy diet:[7]

Other than nutrition, the guide recommends frequent physical exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight.[7]

In addition to dietary recommendations for the general population, there are many specific diets that have primarily been developed to promote better health in specific population groups, such as people with high blood pressure (as in low sodium diets or the more specific DASH diet), or people who are overweight or obese (in weight control diets). However, some of them may have more or less evidence for beneficial effects in normal people as well.

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Aug 7th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

The tremendous benefits of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) cannot be overstated. Most significantly it has long been associated with keeping the heart healthy.1 This is one of the many reasons why it is recommended for Paleo, and well living. Scientific studies have already shown the possible link between EVOO and stroke prevention.2 EVOO has []

Are you looking to save money on your grocery bill while following the Paleo diet? One of the simplest ways to reduce food costs is to grow your own food! Although, planting a garden wasnt something our hunter-gatherer ancestors had to do, it allows us to reconnect to our food source in modern times by []

America is somewhat (in)famous for its work hard, play hard motto,1 whereas Europeans typically work less and relax more.2 As Americas health rapidly declines, many Americans are starting to wake up and realize all those extra hours arent really worth it.3, 4,5 One recent example of this is a Portland-based company Treehouse, who have started []

The Evolutionary Basis for the Therapeutic Effects of High Protein Diets Series Did you miss Evolution and High Protein Diets Part 2? Click Here to Read It! Did you miss Evolution and High Protein Diets Part 3? Click Here to Read It! INTRODUCTION Although humanity has been interested in diet and health for thousands of []

Introduction: Evolutionary Perspective Its pretty clear that if we follow the example of our hunter gatherer ancestors, artificial sweeteners should not be part of contemporary Stone Age diets. In my book, The Paleo Diet Revised (2010)1 I warned against drinking artificially sweetened soft drinks and further strengthened my opposition to all artificial sweeteners in 2012 []

Over the past 5-7 years, more and more people worldwide have become aware of the Paleo Diet, which really is not a diet at all, but rather a lifelong way of eating to reduce the risk of chronic disease and maximize health and wellbeing. One of the fundamental principles of The Paleo Diet is to []

Over the years since the publication of my first book, I have been asked time and again if there is a vegetarian version of The Paleo Diet. Ive got to say emphatically No! Vegetarian diets are a bit of a moving target because they come in at least three major versions. We all know []

I have noticed in the last few years that many Paleo Dieters believe that potatoes can be regularly consumed without any adverse health effects. Part of this misinformation seems to stem from writers of blogs and others who are unfamiliar with the scientific literature regarding potatoes. So should we be eating potatoes or not?

The Recent Evolutionary Introduction of Milk and Dairy One of the rewarding benefits of having written a diet book that has become internationally known is the opportunity to travel the world and speak to tens of thousands of people about this engaging and life changing subject. My signature lecture, Origins and Evolution of the Western []

With the plethora of benefits supported by scientific evidence,1 Gluten-free diets have been gaining in popularity in recent years.2 Studies range from gastrointestinal symptom improvement,3 to possible correlations with autism,4 and diabetes.5 However, there may not be a more fascinating area of gluten study than how the protein composite can be related to cognitive function.6 []

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The Paleo Diet - Live Well, Live Longer.

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Aug 7th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

About two thirds of people in the US are either overweight or obese (1).

However, there are also many people with the opposite problem of being too skinny (2).

This is a concern, because being underweight can be just as bad for your health as being obese.

Additionally, many people who are not clinically underweight still want to gain some muscle.

Whether you are clinically underweight or simply a hard gainer struggling to gain some muscle weight, the main principles are the same.

This article outlines a simple strategy to quickly gain weight, the healthy way.

Being underweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) below 18.5. This is estimated to be less than the body mass needed to sustain optimal health.

Conversely, over 25 is considered overweight and over 30 is considered obese.

Use this calculator to see where you fit on the BMI scale (opens in new tab).

However, keep in mind that there are many problems with the BMI scale, which only looks at weight and height. It does not take muscle mass into account.

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How to Gain Weight Fast and Safely

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Aug 2nd, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet.

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1]

The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream and butter.[1]

Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTsare more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[2][3]

The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant drugs. In the mid-1990s, Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams, whose son's severe epilepsy was effectively controlled by the diet, created the Charlie Foundation to promote it. Publicity included an appearance on NBC's Dateline programme and ...First Do No Harm (1997), a made-for-television film starring Meryl Streep. The foundation sponsored a multicentre research study, the results of whichannounced in 1996marked the beginning of renewed scientific interest in the diet.[1]

Almost half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[4] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patientsthis was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[4][5] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Clinical trials and studies in animal models (including C. elegans[6]) suggest that ketogenic diets provide neuroprotective and disease-modifying benefits for a number of adult neurodegenerative disorders.[7][8] As of 2012, there is limited clinical trial data in these areas, and, outside of paediatric epilepsy, use of the ketogenic diet remains at the research stage.[5][9][10]

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[11] and affects at least 50million people worldwide.[12] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy may occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients will achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas about 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation and the ketogenic diet.[11]

The ketogenic diet is a mainstream therapy that does not use pharmaceutical drugs, which was developed to reproduce the success and remove the limitations of the non-mainstream use of fasting to treat epilepsy.[Note 2] Although popular in the 1920s and 30s, it was largely abandoned in favour of new anticonvulsant drugs.[1] Most individuals with epilepsy can successfully control their seizures with medication. However, 2030% fail to achieve such control despite trying a number of different drugs.[9] For this group, and for children in particular, the diet has once again found a role in epilepsy management.[1][13]

Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c.400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5]Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[14]

The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[15] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages were "detoxified" by consuming a low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with periods of fasting and purging. Two benefited enormously, but most failed to maintain compliance with the imposed restrictions. The diet improved the patients' mental capabilities, in contrast to their medication, potassium bromide, which dulled the mind.[16]

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Jul 31st, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

Safety Information Consult with a doctor before using this product if you are being treated for any medical condition and/or you have a condition that requires you to take prescription drugs of any kind.

Indications For use as a DIETARY SUPPLEMENT when managing your diet in an effort to control appetite, reduce body fat and maintain weight loss, using a proprietary blend of clinically proven, all-natural ingredients, antioxidants and multi-vitamins. This product contains caffeine. Individuals who are caffeine sensitive may experience symptoms including, but not limited to, headache, restlessness, palpitations or insomnia. Do not mix with other sources of caffeine. For best results, use in conjunction with a proper diet and regular exercise. **Consult a physician before starting any diet or exercise program.

Ingredients Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine HCl) Vit B12 (Cyanocobalamin) Citrus aurantium 30% Guarana 22% Caffeine Anhydrous Bioperine Bacopa Monniera Vinpocetine Choline Bitartrate Phenylthylamine Tyrosine Green Coffee Bean Ext Svetol Green Coffee Raspberry Ketones Evodiamine 98% Green Tea Ext Norcoclaurine HCL (Higenamine) Rhodiola rosea Root Ext Quercetin Ashwaganda Rt

Directions DOSAGE and DIRECTIONS For Liporidex MAX: Take TWO CAPSULES in the morning, along with a tall glass of water, preferably on an empty stomach and ONE CAPSULE 5-6 hours later in the mid-afternoon, for a TOTAL of 3 Capsules a day. Do NOT Exceed 4 Capsules in a 24 hour period. Drink plenty of water throughout the day to avoid dehydration. When first using the product, take only ONE capsule to first establish you're not caffeine/stimulant sensitive.

Legal Disclaimer FDA Statement: Results may vary. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product is not intended to treat, diagnose, mitigate, prevent, or cure any condition or disease. These statements are based upon studies on the effects of specific key individual ingredients contained in the supplement and not any any study on the combination of ingredients. Consult with your doctor or physician before beginning any supplement or weight loss program. lipoRIDEX, lipoRIDEX MAXTM, lipoRIDEX PLUSTM lipoRIDEX NRGTM, and lipoRIDEX PMTM are trademarks of Nuretix Research Labs, LLC.

Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. Please see our full disclaimer below.

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Amazon.com: Best Fat Burner for Weight Loss - Liporidex ...

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Jul 22nd, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely

The paleolithic diet, also known as the paleo diet or caveman diet, is a diet based on the food humans' ancient ancestors might likely have eaten, such as meat, nuts and berries, and excludes food to which they likely wouldn't have had access, like dairy.

The diet is based on several premises. Proponents of the diet posit that during the Paleolithic era a period lasting around 2.5 million years that ended about 10,000 years ago with the advent of agriculture and domestication of animals humans evolved nutritional needs specific to the foods available at that time, and that the nutritional needs of modern humans remain best adapted to the diet of their Paleolithic ancestors. Proponents claim that human metabolism has been unable to adapt fast enough to handle many of the foods that have become available since the advent of agriculture. Thus, modern humans are said to be maladapted to eating foods such as grain, legumes, and dairy, and in particular the high-calorie processed foods that are a staple of most modern diets. Proponents claim that modern humans' inability to properly metabolize these comparatively new types of food has led to modern-day problems such as obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. They claim that followers of the Paleolithic diet may enjoy a longer, healthier, more active life.

Critics of the Paleolithic diet have raised a number of objections, including that paleolithic humans did eat grains and legumes,[1] that humans are much more nutritionally flexible than Paleolithic advocates claim, that Paleolithic humans were not genetically adapted to specific local diets, that the Paleolithic period was extremely long and saw a variety of forms of human subsistence, or that little is known for certain about what Paleolithic humans ate. At least one study suggests Neanderthal man and early modern humans ate primarily plant food.[2]

The term Paleolithic () describes a cultural period circa 2 million BCE and 10,000 BCE 'characterized by the use of flint, stone, and bone tools, hunting, fishing, and the gathering of plant foods'.[3] The term was coined by archaeologist John Lubbock in 1865.[4] It derives from Greek: , palaios, "old"; and , lithos, "stone", meaning "old age of the stone" or "Old Stone Age."[5][6]

The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[7] with paleo diet by 2002.[8][9]Loren Cordain trademarked the term "Paleo Diet".[10]

The roots of the idea of a paleolithic diet can be traced to the work in the 1970s by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin.[8] The idea was later developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his best-selling 2002 book, The Paleo Diet.[8][9]

In 2012 the paleolithic diet was described as being one of the "latest trends" in diets, based on the popularity of diet books about it;[11] in 2013 the diet was Google's most searched-for weight-loss method.[12] The diet is one of many fad diets that have been promoted in recent times, and draws on an appeal to nature and a narrative of conspiracy theories about how nutritional research, which does not support the paleo diet, is controlled by a malign food industry.[13]

Cordain has said the diet requires:[14]

Food groups that advocates claim were rarely or never consumed by humans before the Neolithic agricultural revolution are excluded from the diet. These include:

The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from evolutionary medicine,[19] specifically the evolutionary discordance hypothesis. which states that "many chronic diseases and degenerative conditions evident in modern Western populations have arisen because of a mismatch between Stone Age genes and recently adopted lifestyles."[20] Advocates of the modern Paleolithic diet, including Loren Cordain, take the evolutionary discordance hypothesis for granted, and form their dietary recommendations on its basis. They argue that modern humans should follow a diet that is as nutritionally close to that of their Paleolithic ancestors as possible.

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Paleolithic diet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Jul 13th, 2015 | Filed under Diet Safely
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