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If March was a color, it would probably be green. Time springs forward when daylight savings time begins, and many plants will begin growing their green foliage and some of their colorful blooms. Its also a month known for the day of all things green and Irish: St. Patricks Day.

However, there is another green holiday belonging to March: National Celery Month. This holiday is probably healthier and more bizarre than its Irish counterpart, as well as lesser known.

According to National Today, celery has been around for over 2,000 years. The crunchy, stalky vegetable was discovered in the Mediterranean area of Europe around 500 B.C., but different parts of the plant had been used for medicinal purposes for nearly 400 years prior.

Celery is not normally served as a main dish, but many people probably remember eating the classic snack "ants-on-a-log," a celery stick filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins, as a child.

The green vegetable doesnt have much flavor on its own. After all, it is over 90% water. Despite being almost flavorless, the long stalk has a lot of nutritional value.

Celery has over 20 anti-inflammatory compounds, according to Healthline, which can be beneficial to those with joint issues like arthritis.

The veggie, which is sometimes paired with buffalo wings and ranch, also has nutrients to help with digestion. People commonly eat it when dieting because its low in calories but also helps cleanse a persons digestive system.

For those whose digestive systems have a more difficult time processing fibrous foods like celery, juicing has become the popular way to receive some of the same nutrients. #celeryjuice has over 216,000 posts on Instagram alone, not to mention several accounts specifically devoted to celery juice and its benefits.

Amid all the health kicks of the COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps celebrating National Celery Month by adding the veggie to your diet is the way to go.

Features reporter Katelyn Latture can be reached at 270-745-6291 and katelyn.latture423@topper.wku.edu.

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Mar 27th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

Though self-isolating is the best way to protect against COVID-19, being stuck at home can lead to some unhealthy behaviors, including overeating due to stress and boredom.

While taking comfort in food during times of stress is a normal reaction, overeating regularly can negatively affect your health and increase your stress and anxiety levels.

Here are 13 ways to prevent stress eating when youre stuck at home.

Its important to differentiate stress eating from disordered eating practices. If you feel that you have disordered eating tendencies, these tips are not appropriate for your needs.

For information on eating disorder treatment and additional support, contact the National Eating Disorders Association Helpline.

One of the most helpful ways to prevent overeating is to understand why its happening in the first place. There are many reasons why you may be compelled to overeat, including being stressed out or bored.

If you find yourself eating too frequently or eating too much in one sitting, take a minute and check in with yourself. First, its important to determine whether youre eating because youre hungry and need nourishment, or whether theres another reason.

Before you eat, pay special attention to how youre feeling, such as stressed, bored, lonely, or anxious. Simply pausing and evaluating the situation can help you understand what compels you to overeat and may help prevent overeating in the future.

That said, combating overeating is rarely easy, and you may have to seek professional help, especially if its a common occurrence or you eat to the point of discomfort and experience feelings of shame or guilt afterward. These may be signs of disordered eating (1).

Though having a jar of cookies or bowl of colorful candy on the counter may add to the visual appeal of your kitchen, this practice may lead to overeating.

Having tempting foods within eyesight can lead to frequent snacking and overeating, even when you arent hungry.

Research has shown that visual exposure to high calorie foods stimulates the striatum, a part of your brain that modulates impulse control, which may lead to increased cravings and overeating (2, 3, 4).

For this reason, its best to keep particularly tempting foods, including sugary baked goods, candy, chips, and cookies, out of sight, such as in a pantry or cupboard.

To be clear, theres nothing wrong with enjoying a tasty treat occasionally, even when youre not necessarily hungry. However, overindulging too often can harm both your physical and mental health (5).

You shouldnt change your normal eating schedule just because youre stuck at home. If youre used to having three meals a day, try to continue that schedule while youre working from home. The same goes for if you typically consume only two meals and a snack.

Though its easy to stray from your normal dietary pattern when your day-to-day schedule gets disrupted, its important to maintain some semblance of normalcy when it comes to eating.

You may find yourself adapting your eating pattern to accommodate your new normal, and thats OK. Just try to maintain a regular eating pattern based on your individual needs and your preferred eating times.

If youre really thrown off and find yourself constantly snacking, try making a schedule that includes at least two solid meals per day and following it until you feel that you have become comfortably consistent with your eating habits.

One of the most important nutrition rules to follow to prevent overeating is to not deprive your body of food. Oftentimes, being overly restrictive with food intake or consuming too few calories can lead to binging on high calorie foods and overeating (6, 7, 8).

Its never a good idea to follow a highly restrictive diet or deprive yourself of food, especially during stressful times.

Research has shown that restrictive dieting is not only ineffective for long-term weight loss but also can harm your physical and mental health and increase your stress levels (9, 10, 11).

Some good things come along with being stuck at home. Not having the option to eat out at restaurants makes you cook more meals yourself, which has been shown to improve overall health.

For example, a study in 11,396 people found that eating home-cooked meals more frequently was associated with a greater intake of fruits and vegetables.

Plus, it found that people who ate home-cooked meals more than 5 times per week were 28% less likely to be overweight and 24% less likely to have excess body fat, compared with those who ate home-cooked meals less than 3 times per week (12).

Whats more, planning your meals a few days ahead can help you kill time and has even been shown to improve diet quality and reduce obesity risk (13).

Being stuck at home gives you more time to focus on healthy habits, including drinking enough fluids. Maintaining proper hydration is important for overall health and may help you prevent overeating related to stress.

In fact, research has found an association between chronic dehydration and an elevated risk of obesity. Plus, being dehydrated can lead to alterations in mood, attention, and energy levels, which can also affect your eating habits (14, 15).

To combat dehydration, add a few slices of fresh fruit to your water to boost its flavor, which may help you drink more water throughout the day without adding a significant amount of sugar or number of calories to your diet.

Being stuck at home can take a serious toll on your activity levels, leading to boredom, stress, and increased snacking frequency. To combat this, make some time for daily physical activity.

If youre feeling lost due to the closing of your favorite gym or workout studio, try something new like a home workout on YouTube, taking a hike in nature, or simply walking or jogging around your neighborhood.

Research has shown that physical activity can boost mood and reduce stress, which may reduce your chances of stress eating (16).

When you suddenly find yourself with a lot of extra free time, boredom can quickly set in once you have tackled your to-do list for the day.

However, boredom can be prevented by making good use of your spare time. Everyone has hobbies that they have always wanted to try or projects that have been put off due to busy schedules.

Now is the perfect time to learn a new skill, tackle a home improvement project, organize your living spaces, take an educational course, or start a new hobby.

Learning something new or starting a project can not only prevent boredom but also likely make you feel more accomplished and less stressed.

Modern-day life is full of distractions. From smartphones to televisions to social media, youre surrounded by technology meant to distract you from your daily life.

Though catching up on a favorite TV show can help take your mind off of stressful events, its important to minimize distractions when eating a meal or snack, especially if you find yourself frequently overeating.

If youre used to dining while parked in front of your television, smartphone, or computer, try eating in a less distracting environment. Attempt to concentrate only on your food, paying special attention to feelings of hunger and fullness.

Being more present while you eat may help prevent overeating and can help you become more aware of your eating patterns and food intake (17).

Mindful eating is an excellent tool that can be used to bring more awareness to your eating habits.

Check out our 21-day mindful eating challenge here.

Its common for people to snack on foods directly from the containers in which they were sold, which may lead to overeating.

For example, grabbing a pint of ice cream from the freezer and eating directly from the container rather than doling out a single portion in a dish may cause you to eat more than you intended (18).

To combat this, practice portion control by serving yourself a single portion of food rather than eating out of larger containers.

Stocking your kitchen with filling, nutrient-dense foods can not only help improve your overall health but also combat the tendency to stress eat highly palatable foods.

For example, filling your fridge and pantry with foods that can help fill you up in a healthful way rather than foods rich in empty calories like candy, chips, and soda is a smart way to prevent the chances of noshing on unhealthy choices.

Filling foods are ones that are high in protein, fiber, and healthy fats. Nuts, seeds, avocados, beans, and eggs are just some examples of nutritious, satisfying choices that can help fill you up and prevent overeating (19).

While a glass of wine or tasty cocktail can be a relaxing way to unwind, keep in mind that alcohol lowers your inhibitions, increases appetite, and may increase the chances of overeating (20).

Plus, drinking too much alcohol harms your health in a number of ways and can lead to dependence issues (21).

Try to stay within the guidelines set by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which suggests that alcoholic beverages be limited to one drink per day or less for women and two or fewer drinks per day for men (22).

During stressful times, its more important than ever to keep your overall health in mind. Eating nutritious foods is just one part of keeping yourself healthy and happy.

Practicing self-compassion and doing the best that you can given the current circumstances is whats most important.

This is not the time to restrict, overexercise, try a fad diet, compare yourself to others, or focus on weaknesses. If youre struggling with insecurities, body image issues, or anxiety, use this time to foster a new, healthy relationship with your mind and body.

Given the current circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find yourself stuck at home and feeling stressed and bored, which may increase your chances of overeating.

While indulging in comfort foods occasionally, especially during times of stress, is completely normal, overeating regularly can take a toll on your physical and mental health.

The evidence-based tips above may help you control stress eating and improve many other aspects of your health as well.

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13 Ways to Prevent Stress Eating When You're Stuck at Home - Healthline

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Mar 27th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

Posted: Mar 26, 2020 / 12:00 PM MDT / Updated: Mar 26, 2020 / 03:47 PM MDT

We all have routines we like to follow. Youve probably crafted it so you make yourself look your best and healthiest. Something that only takes five minutes that should be part of your routine is Power Swabs.

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This article contains sponsored content.

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Mar 27th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

A personal trainer has revealed how she has replaced a paint tin, bricks and Esky lid for her usual gym equipment now that indoor fitness centres have been shuttered by the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Rachel Dillon, who is based in Queensland, said that anything with resistance, that isnt fragile or dangerous, and can be lifted easily, can be used as a substitute weight.

A coffee table, chair or large Esky container can double as a bench, the 26-year-old told news.com.au, a paint tin can replace free weights, bricks can act as dumbbells, and if you can get your hands on resistance bands you can use your own bodyweight.

But make sure to test them before going full throttle. A simple towel is also a great prop for moves such as hamstring curls, core rollouts, and stretching, she said.

Ms Dillon said that usual gymgoers might be used to using heavier weights, so youll need to alter your training regime to get the most out of a home workout.

Minimise rest between sets and increase training volume (do more reps/sets than usual). Another great way to mix up your training is to add explosive moves that dont require any equipment, such as jump squats, alternating jump lunges, or burpees, she said.

Do what you can, have fun challenging yourself to new ways of training and remember that any movement beats no movement.

One of her favourite full body circuits requires only something heavy like a dumbbell and a skipping rope.

It involves skipping to fire up the heart rate, dumbbell lunges, push ups, rotating squat jumps and shoulder taps.

Ms Dillon grew up playing sports and was always very active, but had a petite build she wanted to work on.

When I first started exercising I was your typical cardio bunny. Spin classes were my favourite, she said on her website.

I was gradually introduced to weight training and quickly fell in love with it. I loved the feeling of becoming fitter and stronger. I never tracked a macro or followed a nutrition plan my focus was just on eating clean foods.

She noticed her body, particularly her glutes, legs and arms, slowly bulking, and after entering two bikini competitions in 2016 and 2017 she gained considerable muscle mass the following year.

I had put a lot of work into my 2017 comp and had dieted pretty hard. Rather than reverse dieting, I found myself over-indulging to compensate for feeling so restricted, she said.

At the time my maintenance calories were quite low and weight gain was happening easier than usual. Although I was gaining weight, I was also training really hard!

I had amazing levels of energy and strength and I really benefited from this. I built a lot of quality muscle and established a great foundation.

These days thebikini world champion eats anywhere between five and six meals a day, totalling between 2000 and 2500 calories.

I try to live by the 80/20 rule, where I eat healthily 80 per cent of the time and treat myself the remaining 20 per cent, she told FEMAIL previously.

I also tend to eat high protein and high fat in the evenings, and carbs around my training times.

Ms Dillons advice for women who want to get a feminine but toned body is to quit dieting and stop cutting carbs, protein and fats from your daily intake:

I always recommend my clients increase their calories incrementally so that they tone up you just need to know what sort of calories to eat.

I also avoid any processed foods and too much sugar, she said.

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Mar 27th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

ANN ARBORThe constant temptation of tasty foods high in calories and fat make it difficult for people to make healthy choices, but talking to yourself in the third person may help, say researchers at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota.

A new study published in Clinical Psychological Science finds that a technique known as distanced self-talk, which refers to an internal dialog using ones name or non-first-person pronouns such as you, he or she, is an effective strategy for making healthier food choices.

Reflecting on ones decisions using ones own name might enhance ones ability to follow through with their goals, which can often be undermined by strong situational lures (such as tempting foods), said study lead author Celina Furman, a former University of Michigan researcher who is now a doctoral student at the University of Minnesota.

Furman and University of Michigan researchers Ethan Kross and Ashley Gearhardt found that psychological distance facilitates self-control by shifting peoples focus away from the highly arousing features of a stimulus.

For example, a piece of chocolate cake can be viewed as highly delicious, but a distanced perspective may lead one to pay attention to abstract features relevant to health goals, such as its high-calorie content.

In the study, young adults disclosed if they were currently dieting or trying to lose weight. They were randomly assigned to watch a two-minute video of health-related commercials that emphasized eating healthy and exercising (health video) or home improvement commercials (control video).

After watching the video, the participants chose between healthy and unhealthy food items on a computer screen. For each pair of foods, participants were instructed to use either first-person self-talk (What do I want?) or distanced self-talk ([Name], what do you want?) in a counterbalanced order.

Among the findings:

Since people are regularly confronted with cheap and accessible tasty foods, self-control strategies that are easy to implement when encountering these foods are more likely to be effective for improving dietary choices, said Kross, a professor of psychology who has extensively researched distanced self-talk.

The researchers said making minor changes in eating can make a difference in peoples lives.

We do know that even reducing caloric intake by a couple hundred calories a day can be important for preventing unhealthy weight gain and promoting weight loss, said Gearhardt, an associate professor of psychology. We need to do additional studies in the future about the impact of distanced self-talk on actual caloric intake, but even small improvements can lead to big public health gains over time.

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Talking to yourself in the third person can promote healthier eating - University of Michigan News

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Mar 25th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

Finding kale and quinoa has never been easier than it is right now. Oreos and Spam, not so much.

We know about the toilet paper and hand sanitizer shortages. There are other problems. I've visited at least five grocers in the last week in my Los Angeles neighborhood, and the processed foods shelves are empty.

That problem is not only occurring here. Food giants like General Mills and Campbell Soup are experiencing sales gains between 10-20 percent. Popcorn, pretzels, and potato chips are even higher, between 30-48 sales increases over this time last year.

This is not the direction we should be moving in during a pandemicor ever, but especially right now.

First, we must differentiate between processed foods and packaged goods. The latter is understandable: beans, pasta, rice, saucesthese too have been filling carts. The issue is "comfort foods," processed and packaged foodstuffs high in sugars and emulsifiers, which are selling at an even higher rate. At a time when we need our immune systems to be as healthy as possible, diet has never mattered more.

Emotional eating during such an unprecedented time is understandable, expectable even. We gravitate toward sugar- and carb-heavy foods when stressed. But for the sake of not only your health, but our overtaxed health care system, we all need to think more deeply about what we're putting into our bodies.

I've covered health for Big Think since 2012 and have read hundreds of studies concerning diet and fitness. Time and again, two methods appear to work best: closing your feeding window and calorie restriction. The former is usually packaged with the title "intermittent fasting," but really it's just about not eating from the moment you wake up until right before bed. Restricting your feeding window to 10 hours a day or less seems to bestow the greatest benefits; even 12 hours is beneficial. The majority of Americans eat over the course of 14 hours per day.

Calorie restriction is usually associated with the Singularity set as an anti-aging protocol, but don't be dissuaded by that crowd. Plenty of research has backed up the health benefits of reducing your caloric load. A new study from a team of collaborators from the US and China discusses why that is.

Published in the journal Cell, a team at Salk Institute's Gene Expression Laboratory in La Jolla (along with former Salk alumni now based in China) tested 56 rats over the course of nine months, age 18 months to 27 months. For comparison sake, that is the equivalent of tracking human diets from age 50 to 70.

The parameters are pretty simple: one group was given one caloric load, while the other was fed 30 percent fewer calories. The team then analyzed 168,703 cells from 40 different cell types, including cells from bone marrow, skin, brain, and muscle tissue.

Cells from rats on the calorie-restricted diet resembled young rats by the end of the study. A total of 57 percent of the aging changes in the non-restricted rats were not prevalent in the dieting group. Co-corresponding author Guang-Hui Liu (at the Chinese Academy of Sciences) breaks it down:

"This approach not only told us the effect of calorie restriction on these cell types, but also provided the most complete and detailed study of what happens at a single-cell level during aging."

Photo: Getty Images

The cells most affected by higher calorie intake include those linked to lipid metabolism as well as immunity and inflammation response. In fact, inflammation kept increasing in rat bingers. Chronic inflammation is one of the biggest consequences of the "Western diet," which negatively impacts a range of cancers and metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

Even more urgent at this moment are the cytokine storms caused by COVID-19. While the virus is hitting elderly and immune-suppressed populations hardest, victims of every age group are experiencing this deadly inflammatory response. Whether or not diet is specifically related to COVID-19 is unknown, but we do know that two consequences of obesity are immune problems and inflammation. If you prime your body by eating foods that promote inflammation, you're going to have trouble fighting off disease.

Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, also a co-corresponding author on this paper, is hopeful that this research will open up new avenues of treatment.

"We already knew that calorie restriction increases life span, but now we've shown all the changes that occur at a single-cell level to cause that. This gives us targets that we may eventually be able to act on with drugs to treat aging in humans."

Never in history has it been so apparent that we're all in this together. Social media keeps us dialed in for constant updates. If a greater emphasis on our health care system (as well as individual health) is an outcome of this pandemic, we can at least chalk that up as one small victory.

Right now, of course, we need to focus on the most vulnerable populations. While we live through this, however, don't put yourself at risk of being in that population. Eat smarter, and eat less.

--

Stay in touch with Derek on Twitter and Facebook. His next book is "Hero's Dose: The Case For Psychedelics in Ritual and Therapy."

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Mar 25th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

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The constant temptation of tasty foods high in calories and fat can make it tough to eat healthy. Talking to yourself in the third person may help, a new study shows.

Researchers say a technique known as distanced self-talk, which refers to an internal dialogue using ones name or non-first-person pronouns such as you, he, or she, works effectively for making healthier food choices.

Reflecting on ones decisions using ones own name might enhance ones ability to follow through with their goals, which can often be undermined by strong situational lures (such as tempting foods), says lead author Celina Furman, a former University of Michigan researcher, now a doctoral student at the University of Minnesota.

Furman and University of Michigan researchers Ethan Kross and Ashley Gearhardt found that psychological distance shifts peoples focus away from the highly arousing features of a stimulus to make self-control easier.

For example, a piece of chocolate cake can look delicious, but a distanced perspective may help you pay attention to abstract features relevant to health goals, such as the cakes high-calorie content.

In the study, young adults disclosed if they were currently dieting or trying to lose weight. Researchers randomly assigned them to watch a two-minute video of health-related commercials that emphasized eating healthy and exercising (health video) or home improvement commercials (control video).

After watching the video, the participants chose between healthy and unhealthy food items on a computer screen. For each pair of foods, the researchers told participants to use either first-person self-talk (What do I want?) or distanced self-talk ([Name], what do you want?) in a counterbalanced order.

Among the findings:

Since cheap and accessible tasty foods regularly confront us, easy to implement self-control strategies when encountering these food temptations have a better chance of improving dietary choices, says Kross, a professor of psychology.

Making minor changes in eating can make a difference in peoples lives, the researchers say.

We do know that even reducing caloric intake by a couple hundred calories a day can be important for preventing unhealthy weight gain and promoting weight loss, says Gearhardt, an associate professor of psychology.

We need to do additional studies in the future about the impact of distanced self-talk on actual caloric intake, but even small improvements can lead to big public health gains over time.

Source: University of Michigan

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To avoid tempting food, talk to yourself in the third person - Futurity: Research News

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Mar 25th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

Weve come a long way from Fat Monica.

More than 20 years since the character appeared on Friends, its now widely accepted that the gag was offensive, designed for cheap laughs at a fat womans expense. Fat suits worn by thin actors January Jones (Mad Men), Gwyneth Paltrow (Shallow Hal) and Eddie Murphy (The Nutty Professor) are no longer de rigueur. And several recent series feature fat women as protagonists, including This Is Us, Shrill, Dietland and Good Girls.

Which raises the question: Is it enough simply to avoid outright fat-phobia, or should we expect more of such series than fat heroines consumed with their desire not to be fat? What if there were a Bechdel test for female body representation?

The original Bechdel test was named after a cartoonist, Alison Bechdel, who published a 1985 comic strip in which one of the characters outlined three rules for the movies she sees: First, the movie must have at least two women in it; second, they must talk to each other; and third, they must discuss something other than a man. Later versions of the Bechdel test added the rule that the women must be named.

Hearteningly, TV writers have begun to think more about the interiority of fat women, who represent a large percentage of the U.S. population the average American woman weighs 170 pounds and has a body mass index of 29.6, just shy of being considered obese. But, as many other marginalized communities have stressed, mere representation is just the jumping off point, not the end goal. Its not just about fat women being more visible on TV. A Bechdel-style test might pressure creators to tell more fat-positive stories about women who dont hate their bodies.

The notion of a Bechdel-style test by which to measure such stories was inspired by Netflixs Orange Is the New Black, which was revolutionary in its depiction of womens bodies. The women at Litchfield prison were an accurate reflection of real-world body diversity. There were Cindy, Big Boo, DeMarco, CO Ginger and plenty of other small fat characters like Daya, Taystee, Red and Suzanne. Crucially, the women never talked about dieting or obsessed about their weight. To pass the test proposed here, TV series would essentially have to meet the Orange Is the New Black standard: Cast fat women in main roles and not have their story lines revolve around their weight or desire not to be fat.

Netflixs Orange Is the New Black, which concluded last year, was a pioneer in putting a diverse array of womens bodies on screen.

(JoJo Whilden / Netflix)

Few shows would currently ace such an exam, including the most visible example, the hit drama This Is Us. As several critics have pointed out, Kate, played by Chrissy Metz, is frustrating because of the outsize focus on her fatness. Kate is deserving of personhood and dynamism only during those times when her singular purpose is unfatting herself, comedian Guy Branum wrote about the story lines harmful messages: Happiness and success are there for Kate, but ... only as part of her narrative of losing fat.

During its fourth season, which concludes Tuesday, This Is Us has continued to reinforce those messages: In the wake of having a baby who is blind, Kates husband, Toby (Chris Sullivan), has lost weight, and much of the season has revolved around her resentment about that and her worry that he has lost interest in her. When Toby chalks up his weight loss to stress about the baby in Episode 2, Kate responds, Too bad it doesnt work for me: Even with a newborn with a disability, shes still obsessing about her weight. Its a creative decision that reinforces the fatphobic expectation that women should bounce back to their pre-baby weight as soon as possible, one exacerbated when Toby says that Kate, who is breastfeeding and thus needs to consume more calories, is overeating as a way of dealing with her feelings.

Melissa Zimdars, professor of communication and media at Merrimack College and author of Watching Our Weights: The Contradictions of Televising Fatness in the Obesity Epidemic, sees This Is Us differently. While she agrees that We need representations that dont mention fatness, she also acknowledges the worth of addressing the pressures that many people, especially women, still feel to be thin. We do see the character of Kate ... generally buying in to this pressure, which doesnt really push our society toward fat liberation, but certainly reflects the experiences of many viewers who identify as fat.

By contrast, Shrill ultimately offers a fat-positive narrative: It is, at heart, about a woman realizing that losing weight wont make her happy. Starring Aidy Bryant as a writer named Annie based on the real-life writer Lindy West Shrill drew acclaim in its first season for its radical, affirming episode set at a fat babe pool party. But its second, which premiered on Hulu earlier this year, passes the adjusted Bechdel test with flying colors. In one scene at a restaurant with her boyfriend and parents, Annie combats the intergenerational internalized fat-phobia so often passed from mother to daughter: When her mom declines dessert because Ive been so bad with all the pasta and the bread, Annie gloriously pushes back, How have you been bad? Its food.

On the darker end of the spectrum is Netflixs 2019 limited series Unbelievable, lauded for its nuanced portrayal of sexual assault and what can go wrong when women report it. The series represents diverse female bodies among the rape survivors, including one, played by Danielle Macdonald, whose arc challenges the myth that fat women dont get sexually assaulted while also depicting the character with a loving boyfriend.

Its decisions like these that go a long way toward reflecting fat womens bodies and experiences back to them on the small screen. Giving fat female characters story lines that dont revolve around their weight as in Orange Is the New Black, Shrill and Unbelievable is the next step in helping destigmatize fat women in the real world.

Danielle Macdonald, left, and Merritt Wever in Unbelievable on Netflix.

(Beth Dubber / Netflix)

Liz Sczudlo, a supervising producer on Dynasty who has also written for Jane the Virgin, Switched at Birth, 90210 and other shows, said that things have improved in terms of body representation, down to the size of the actors: When I started at 90210 10 years ago, those actresses were very, very thin all zeros or double zeros, she said. Now, It is absolutely normal to be a size 4 which is still so small, but its an improvement. Sczudlo also noted that theres more sensitivity to the ways writers speak about actors bodies.

Still, Sczudlo feels theres a stigma attached to advocating for diverse body sizes: As a fat woman, Ive never been on a show where I felt like there was ever a push for casting people who looked like me or even conversation about it. And without a system-wide conversation in Hollywood, she doesnt feel equipped to speak up. I sold a show with a fat lead. And I was really psyched to make it and it didnt work out, she said. But I think in my mind I have to wait until I have a little more leverage personally to bring it up.

For Kim Ndombe, who has written for Raising Dion, Good Trouble and Sorry for Your Loss, the biggest problem is that in most writers rooms, no ones even thinking about body size: The default character is thin and fit. We so rarely in the room write a character and say, This could be somebody fat. Unless its extremely purposeful, she said. (In the latter case, she added, the characters story line tends to revolve around their fatness.)

Ndombe underscored the importance of having fat people in writers rooms. As a black writer whos sometimes been brought into a room to add a diverse perspective, shes sensitive to tokenization, which can also happen if theres only one fat writer. Thats why, even though shes not fat, she can understand the desire for a Bechdel-like test that would ensure fat women arent all written as hating their bodies.

Among the barriers involved in challenging fat-phobia in Hollywood is the fact that, as Sczudlo explained, casting involves so many levels of approval. The first level is the casting director, whose opinion on body size matters, she said. If the casting director hasnt received instructions to be body-inclusive, they might not pass that person along to you. Then the writer, director and showrunner weigh in, with the last making the decision about whom to pass on to studio casting and then, finally, network casting. In other words, as Sczudlo summed up, For it to change, you would have to have a showrunner decide, This is really important to me and Im going to speak to both my casting director and studio and network casting so that were all on the same page.

Beanie Feldstein, left, and Kaitlyn Dever in Booksmart.

(Francois Duhamel / Annapurna Pictures)

A Bechdel test for female body representation is clearly aspirational at this point. Still, the extant examples of fat-positive storytelling in film and TV prove that its possible to write fat female characters who arent defined by their body size.

When I asked Ndombe and Sczudlo whether the whole idea was an absurd fantasy, they both pointed to a movie that would have passed the test: Olivia Wildes directing debut, Booksmart. Speaking about Molly, Beanie Feldsteins character, Ndombe said, They have these really cute characters talking about how cute she is and how they would totally [have sex with] her if it wasnt for her personality. Thats amazing.

For Sczudlo, it was personal: Ive never felt so seen, she said. The problem isnt her weight, the problem is that shes annoying. And that was my problem in high school.

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'This Is Us': Does Season 4 pass the Bechdel test for fat women? - Los Angeles Times

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Mar 25th, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

Whenever I try dieting vs The frustrated Indian driver, concluding the best pick of Chanchlani

Ashish has given us healthy laughter each time with his substance. He is one of the predominant YouTube stars, who is well known for his droll satire and adaptable characters played at a solitary hand! It isnt even remotely smooth to make that prompt move to jobs, it is totally hypnotizing to watch, yet it takes a great deal of time and capability to make those! Ashishs slapstick comedy is easier to interpret. People are fond of easy and smooth content. Not everyone is Shakespeare, Ashish indeed has the high intellect to break it down to his subscribers so that they dont feel that the script is going all over their head.

Ashishs recent uploads Whenever I try dieting, deals with everyday issues with an ordinary foodie, struggling to lose weight every day with their new diet resolution, which fails badly at the end of the day, like of course who could resist those awesome junk dishes, its worth to drool over!

The frustrated Indian driver depicts the regular scenes of the Indian traffic and of course Indians. In this video, Ashish typifies the basic instinct of an Indian driver, who gets to deal with the tantrums of the pedestrians and the traffic police as well!

Both the videos will give you a complete, LOL!

Here are they!

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Whenever I try dieting Vs The frustrated Indian driver: Which is your best Ashish Chanchlanis pick? - IWMBuzz

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Mar 23rd, 2020 | Filed under Dieting

IN a sport where dieting is second nature to pretty much everyone, missing out on a carrot or two is a major issue.

The big battle now is to make sure the lack of competitive horse racing and more spare time doesnt lead to the biscuit barrel.

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At 5ft 10ins, Yorkshire-based Jack Garritty is one of the tallest jockeys on the Flat race circuit, and keeping on top of his weight is a battle at the best of times.

In normal circumstances, though, at least there is the motivation of some winning prize money at the end of it all.

If dropping a pound of two on the scales leads to an extra thousand or two in the pocket, then its worth the wasting.

But suddenly, with racing going the same way as all other sports, that carrot, that incentive, has gone. Initially until the end of next month, but quite possibly beyond even that.

The financial kick in the guts is obvious, but Garritty has also revealed there is also a psychological fight to be won.

He said: Keeping my weight down is huge thing for me, because I am a tall lad as it is, and its a big job. Its very hard to stay on top of it mentally as much as anything.

When you are dieting in a normal situation, at least theres the benefit of more money coming in. Mentally it is so draining.

Youve not got the goal of winners and prize money and obviously youre left with more time on your hands, which makes it easier to nip to the biscuit cupboard.

And just like they talk of match fitness in football, rugby or whatever, the same applies to race fitness.

You can be as fit as you like but its still not the same as when you are riding in races. Its just great that Jack Berry House is on the doorstep, so Im in the gym there a lot at the moment.

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At 23, Garritty son of former National Hunt jockey Russ is one of Flat racings up and coming stars.

A professional for nearly five years, he rides for a host of Yorkshire trainers such as Richard Fahey, Jedd OKeeffe, Ruth Carr.

It also means plenty of work riding and with the racing shutdown still in its early stages, at least that aspect hasnt changed greatly, so for now the mortgage and bills are catered for.

But it is a situation which can only go on for so long and gallop riding doesnt command anything like the riding fee of just over 120 a race.

While the top earners may be able to ride the crisis, for most jockeys, the margins are small.

For example, a survey a couple of years ago showed that in Britain, only three Flat jockeys made as much as the 200th highest-earning golfer on the PGA Tour.

It is a startling comparison, and shows how desperate all involved are that the shutdown doesnt extend much beyond the current six week plan.

Garritty added: At the moment the training routine is still pretty much the same. Im still riding out most mornings and getting paid for that.

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But with no actual races themselves, its very frustrating because theres nothing at the end of it and obviously earnings are down as well.

Riding out is good to bring in some money, and its usually paid at an hourly rate, like a lot of jobs, but nothing like having three or four rides a day, or ten to 12 a week.

Its a contribution, and youre still grafting, but obviously with no races, there is no prospect of any prize money either.

Im lucky in that Im going in to ride work six days a week, so Im ticking over quite nicely, but thats probably going to change if this goes on for long.

And Im also in the nice position of having my own house, and my girlfriend Hayley works at Richard Faheys, so she knows the racing game.

Fortunately Im a tight Yorkshireman and also had good advice from everyone around me, and to be fair my mum and dad pointed me in the right direction.

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Ive always been lucky to ride for good people and am in a good situation as regards that. But I do have a mortgage and bills to pay, so I dont know how long its sustainable.

Everyones in a very difficult position, and if it went on for, say, three months, it would be very tough for all of us.

I couldnt say how long it would be possible to keep going without any racing but the most important thing is everyone keeping healthy and well.

Its a worrying time, but all I can do is carry on as I am. I cant influence the situation or change things, so you just keep trying to move forward. Were all in the same boat.

The racing community has to stick together to get through it, and around here were lucky, there are so many of us were like a family. We all look out for each other - and never more than right now.

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Coronavirus shutdown: Phil Thomas speaks to Jack Garritty about the challenges facing jockeys - The Irish Sun

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Mar 23rd, 2020 | Filed under Dieting
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