More Weight Loss Solutions

Archives

Archive for the ‘Dieting’ Category


The Geordie Motivator on Dieting
"Just say nooooooo...Don #39;t do it, don #39;t do it...Don #39;t even think about eating that!"

By: Geordie Motivator

See the article here:

The Geordie Motivator on Dieting - Video

Comments Off on The Geordie Motivator on Dieting – Video
Oct 16th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting

However, our results show that achieving a weight loss target of 12.5 per cent is more likely, and drop-out is lower, if losing weight is done quickly."

The number of people who regained weight after three years was also the same in both groups, 71 per cent, suggesting that crash dieting is better than gradual weight loss in the short term and no worse in the long term.

The researchers suggest that losing weight quickly motivates dieters to stick with their programme because they see rapid results. Very low calorie crash diets also usually cut out carbohydrates, which usually fuels the body and therefore forces the body to burn fat more quickly.

Prof Susan Jebb, Professor of Diet and Population Health, University of Oxford, said: This is an important and well conducted study. It shows clearly that the common claim that more rapid initial weight loss is associated with more rapid regain is false.

This is important because it will enable professionals to recommend a broader range of treatment options so that people may be more likely to find the one that is best suited to their lifestyle.

Interestingly, the rapid weight loss group were more likely to achieve their target weight loss and more likely to stick with the programme. These factors are both important to successful weight control.

However some British experts suggested that losing weight over 36 weeks may be considered too fast to be considered very gradual weight loss and said the results may have been different if the researcher had allowed partipants longer.

This is not really a surprising result, since I would suggest that both conditions represent more rapid weight loss than desirable, said Naveed Sattar, Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Glasgow

One must remember that weight gain in many who are obese has occurred over years and reversal may need to be relatively slow so that the bodys brain and gut homeostatic systems that regulate appetite have time to reset.

The present study suggests that too rapid a change in weight lead many to fail with weight loss in the longer term.

View post:

Crash-dieting more effective than gradual weight loss, study suggests

Comments Off on Crash-dieting more effective than gradual weight loss, study suggests
Oct 16th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting

However, our results show that achieving a weight loss target of 12.5 per cent is more likely, and drop-out is lower, if losing weight is done quickly."

The number of people who regained weight after three years was also the same in both groups, 71 per cent, suggesting that crash dieting is better than gradual weight loss in the short term and no worse in the long term.

The researchers suggest that losing weight quickly motivates dieters to stick with their programme because they see rapid results. Very low calorie crash diets also usually cut out carbohydrates, which usually fuels the body and therefore forces the body to burn fat more quickly.

Prof Susan Jebb, Professor of Diet and Population Health, University of Oxford, said: This is an important and well conducted study. It shows clearly that the common claim that more rapid initial weight loss is associated with more rapid regain is false.

This is important because it will enable professionals to recommend a broader range of treatment options so that people may be more likely to find the one that is best suited to their lifestyle.

Interestingly, the rapid weight loss group were more likely to achieve their target weight loss and more likely to stick with the programme. These factors are both important to successful weight control.

However some British experts suggested that losing weight over 36 weeks may be considered too fast to be considered very gradual weight loss and said the results may have been different if the researcher had allowed partipants longer.

This is not really a surprising result, since I would suggest that both conditions represent more rapid weight loss than desirable, said Naveed Sattar, Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Glasgow

One must remember that weight gain in many who are obese has occurred over years and reversal may need to be relatively slow so that the bodys brain and gut homeostatic systems that regulate appetite have time to reset.

The present study suggests that too rapid a change in weight lead many to fail with weight loss in the longer term.

Original post:

Crash-dieting more effective that gradual weight loss, study suggests

Comments Off on Crash-dieting more effective that gradual weight loss, study suggests
Oct 16th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting

When it comes to dieting, the conventional wisdom holds that losing weight gradually is more sustainable in the long run than losing weight quickly. But new results from a long-term clinical trial show that this is just another dieting myth.

Both fast and slow weight loss produced pretty modest results over the long term. But in some respects, the rapid weight-loss regimen tested in the study worked better than its slow-but-steady counterpart, according to a report published Thursday by the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.

The study involved 200 obese Australian adults between the ages of 18 and 70. Ninety-seven of them were randomly assigned to a strict diet that replaced breakfast, lunch and dinner with Optifast shakes. By consuming only 450 to 800 calories per day, their goal was to lose 15% of their body weight in 12 weeks. The other 103 volunteers were asked to drink Optifast shakes once or twice a day and prepare their remaining meals according to the recommendations in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. This plan was supposed to lead to a 15% reduction in body weight over 36 weeks.

Volunteers in both groups also had meetings with dietitians and received educational materials about healthful eating.

Despite its austerity, the extreme diet worked better for more people than the gradual diet, according to the study. Among the volunteers who made it to the end of the weight-loss portion of the study, 81% of those on the rapid plan lost at least 12.5% of their body weight. For volunteers on the gradual diet, only 62% achieved the same goal.

One of the reasons for this success was that the extreme diet was more tolerable than the gradual one (perhaps because it lasted for only three months instead of nine). Only 3% of those assigned to the rapid weight-loss regimen dropped out of the study, compared with 18% of those in the gradual program.

Volunteers who followed the rapid plan were getting more exercise (2,291 extra steps per day, on average) than their counterparts on the gradual diet (an average of 1,300 extra steps per day). However, the gradual dieters saw bigger improvements in both waist and hip circumference. The drop in BMI was virtually the same in both groups: 5.3 points lower for those fueled only by Optifast and 5.2 points lower for those who got to eat at least some real food.

But losing weight isnt the hardest part of a diet -- the bigger challenge is keeping it off. So the researchers tracked the volunteers who were still part of the study for 144 more weeks. During that time, all of them were advised to follow an individualized diet for weight maintenance, according to the study.

Of the 127 volunteers who completed the study, all but six -- five who lost weight rapidly and one who lost weight gradually -- started to gain back some of the pounds they had shed. Those who started with the extreme diet lost a little more than 32 pounds after the initial 12-week period but gained back 23 of them. And those who lost weight gradually dropped 31.5 pounds after 36 weeks but gained back 22 of them.

The net result after more than three years: Those who followed the gradual diet ended up losing 0.44 pounds more, on average, than those who followed the rapid diet.

Read more here:

Losing weight quickly is just as good (or bad) as losing it gradually

Comments Off on Losing weight quickly is just as good (or bad) as losing it gradually
Oct 16th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting

The study found that those who lost weight faster were more likely to achieve target weight loss [GETTY]

Experts have dismissed the theory that people who lose a rapid amount of weight over a short period of time will put it back on just as quickly.

And they even say that quickly shedding excess weight is the best way of achieving a target.

Dietician and study first author Katrina Purcell said: "Across the world, guidelines recommend gradual weight loss for the treatment of obesity, reflecting the widely held belief that fast weight loss is more quickly regained.

Our results show that achieving a weight loss target of 12.5 per cent is more likely, and drop-out is lower, if losing weight is done quickly

Katrina Purcell, dietician

"However, our results show that achieving a weight loss target of 12.5 per cent is more likely, and drop-out is lower, if losing weight is done quickly."

The study, led by Joseph Proietto fromt the University of Melbourne in Australia, set out to examine whether losing weight at a slow initial rate, as recommended by current guidelines worldwide, results in larger long-term weight reduction - and less weight regain - than losing weight at a faster initial rate.

It showed that, in the obese, slow and steady weight loss is not better at preventing the amount or rate of weight regain compared with losing weight quickly.

The research, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, included 200 obese adults with a BMI of between 30 and 45 who were randomly assigned to either a 12-week rapid weight loss (RWL) programme on a very-low-calorie diet of 450-800 calories a day) or a 36-week gradual weight-loss (GWL) programme.

Read the original here:

Crash dieting IS the best way to loose weight, say experts

Comments Off on Crash dieting IS the best way to loose weight, say experts
Oct 15th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting

Diets are popular. A close friend, a co-worker, a family member, a teacher and a neighbor are all dieting. They lose 5, 10, maybe 25 pounds at a rapid pace and find themselves four months later weighing more than they did before their diet. The question is: Why? Dieting creates an illusion; people see the numbers on the scale go down, but in reality they arent losing body fat and are only setting themselves up for failure. New research shows that weight fluctuation and repeated dieting is a contributor to heart diseases, obesity, inadequate nutrition, fatigue, weakness and gallstones. In addition, dieting creates negative psychological effects including weight obsession, poor self-image, disordered eating patterns, disordered lifestyle, and an increased sense of failure.

People who have been dieting are likely to be out of tune with their body and its signals of hunger and fullness. Nutrition Dimension, a nutrition education website, claims, People on diets do not have normal, healthy relationship with food and are, therefore, destined to fail in their quest to lose weight; and, will in fact, likely gain more in the long term. Self-control is what many people look for when dieting. They want to be able to say no to certain foods that dieting prohibits while at the same time their body craves these foods and the nutrients they provide. Doctor Phil McGraw, author of The Ultimate Weight Lose Solution, recommends to find other ways to cope with food, such as to avoid places were trouble foods are likely to be.

Many diets restrict essential nutrients, like low-carbohydrate diets. People have developed a negative relationship with carbohydrates due to these well-publicized diets. According to Linda Omichinski, a registered dietitian, Dieters are not accustomed to eating carbohydrates. They are not aware that by taking more protein sources and cutting back on carbohydrates, such as bread and pasta, they are actually setting themselves up to crave carbohydrates from other sources, such as cake and cookies. The lack of carbohydrates in the body causes dieters to crave sweets as a quick source of fuel. The sweets then end up adding to the dieters weight because they eat too many calories. If people ate the carbohydrates that their body needs, they would crave fewer sweets. Carbohydrates are energy the body uses in everyday basics, and theyre essential for high intensity exercises.

Changing your eating habits is the key to success. Its not about restricting foods, its about learning the consequences of the food you are eating, and about processed food. Cook at home, and dont eat at fast-food restaurants out of convenience. Every day eat three meals and two snacks, because skipping meals will lead you to overeat or eat the wrong foods. Buy real food, buy organic, and avoid foods with hormones or pesticides that damage your health. Plan your day; dont let hunger catch you off guard. You will pick at whatever food is in front of you when you are hungry. Learning about what foods your body likes will make you feel more energetic, clear minded, and will help you lose weight. Over all, enjoy your food, and dont be at war with the products that make you healthy.

Changing your eating habits is what ultimately will lead you to weight loss and a healthier life: dieting is temporary and causes permanent physical and psychological harm.

Sandro Torres is a fitness professional at and owner of Custom Body Fitness in Carbondale. His column appears on the second Tuesday of the month in Body & More.

See the article here:

Why dieting doesnt work

Comments Off on Why dieting doesnt work
Oct 14th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting


Post Competition Dieting
Post competition dieting- How to stay on track.

By: tiffany mitchellmull

Read the original:

Post Competition Dieting - Video

Comments Off on Post Competition Dieting – Video
Oct 13th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting

High-protein diets. Low-fat diets. All-vegetable diets. No-carb diets. With all the focus on dieting, how do you figure out what's healthy and what isn't?

Lots of people feel pressured to lose weight and try different types of diets. But if you really need to lose weight, improving your eating habits and exercising will help you more than any diet.

People diet for many reasons. Some are at an unhealthy weight and need to pay closer attention to their eating and exercise habits. Some play sports and want to be in top physical condition. Others may think they would look and feel better if they lost a few pounds.

Some people may diet because they think they are supposed to look a certain way. Actors and actresses are thin, and most fashions are shown off by very thin models. But this look is unrealistic for most people not to mention physically damaging to the models and stars who struggle to maintain it.

By the time they turn 12 or 13, most teen girls start to go through body changes that are natural and necessary: Their hips broaden, their breasts develop, and suddenly the way they look may not match girls on TV or in magazine ads. Guys develop at different rates, too. Those guys with washboard abs you see in clothing ads are usually in their twenties.

Any diet on which you eat fewer calories than you need to get through the day like an 800-calorie-per-day diet, for instance can be dangerous. Diets that don't allow any fat also can be bad for you. Everyone needs a certain amount of fat in their diet about 30% of total calories so no one should eat a completely fat-free diet.

Don't fall for diets that restrict certain food groups, either. A diet that requires you to say no to bread or pasta or allows you to eat only fruit is unhealthy. You won't get the vitamins and minerals you need. And although you may lose weight, you'll probably gain it back as soon as you start eating normally again.

Some people start dieting because they think all the problems in their lives are because of weight. Others have an area of their lives that they can't control, like an alcoholic parent, so they focus excessively on something they can control their exercise and food intake.

People who diet may get lots of praise and compliments from friends and family when they start losing pounds, which makes them feel good. But eventually a person reaches a weight plateau and doesn't lose as much weight as before because the body is trying to maintain a healthy weight. People in these situations eventually discover that, even if they do lose weight, they aren't any happier.

See the rest here:

The Deal With Diets - KidsHealth

Comments Off on The Deal With Diets – KidsHealth
Oct 13th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting


Why Can #39;t I Lose Weight Eating Healthy: Healthy Dieting May Slow Weight Loss
You can #39;t lose weight eating healthy. Why not? Each of us processes food differently so the key is finding out what foods make YOUR body tick! Meet my friend Emily the girl everyone loves to...

By: Healthy Hot Air

Read more:

Why Can't I Lose Weight Eating Healthy: Healthy Dieting May Slow Weight Loss - Video

Comments Off on Why Can’t I Lose Weight Eating Healthy: Healthy Dieting May Slow Weight Loss – Video
Oct 11th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting


Dieting - Ep. 19 | As We Proceed
SUBSCRIBE | LIKE | COMMENT As We Proceed Ep. 19: "DIETING" Sometimes.. just sometimes... You can #39;t help but over indulge NEW VIDEO EVERY MONDAY FOLLOW US TWI...

By: Sunny and Shay

Continued here:

Dieting - Ep. 19 | As We Proceed - Video

Comments Off on Dieting – Ep. 19 | As We Proceed – Video
Oct 11th, 2014 | Filed under Dieting
Weight Loss Solutions